Some Canadian Guys is dead. Long live Some Canadian Guys.

Posted in Uncategorized on November 14, 2010 by squizz

So… if you like the black background and super-grainy image of our 1986 World Cup team, then we’ve got some bad news for you.

For the other 99.9% of you, we’ve got great news!

As of Monday, November 15, 2010, Some Canadian Guys Writing About Soccer will be found at our new home at CanadianSoccerNews.com. The new super-site is a collaborative work between us and some of the other Canadian soccer bloggers and podcasters you probably already love/tolerate.

We’ll still be bringing you the same great work and/or nonsense we’re bringing you now — plus, we’ll be part of a larger community of discussion about all the forms of soccer that matters to Canadians: our national teams, our domestic teams, our youth programs and the international game.

This site (canadiansoccerblog.ca) will remain active for a little while, as we complete the transition from the old home to the new. But please adjust your bookmarks, blogrolls and brainwaves to reflect the location of all new content — our home at CanadianSoccerNews.com.

Thanks for all the support everyone, and we’ll see you at CSN!

Cheers,
Grant, Jamie and Squizz

Why the hell did Chelsea fire Ray Wilkins?

Posted in Chelsea, England with tags , on November 13, 2010 by Grant

I rarely write about Chelsea in this space anymore because there are hundreds of other places on the Internet that cover English football. But I do keep reasonably abreast of what’s happening at Chelsea through the usual channels: UK media, blogs, online forums, etc.

Like many Chelsea followers, I was immensely puzzled by the sudden departure of assistant manager Ray Wilkins this week. Up until about a year and a half ago, the unexplained departure of a member of the coaching staff – ie. the manager – would have simply been par for the course. That’s the kind of reputation you get after five managers in five years. But the Carlo Ancelotti era had ushered in a strange, almost boring period of calm. Until now.

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Teal Bunbury “lost” to the USA? It’s not that simple

Posted in Canada, U.S. soccer with tags , , , , , , , on November 11, 2010 by squizz

Let’s make one thing crystal clear, first off: Teal Bunbury is not the “next” anybody.

He’s not the next oft-injured Englishman, or the next Dutch-but-maybe-Canadian-after-all midfielder, and he’s certainly not the next bench-warming Bosnian goalkeeper.

But he is a Canadian-born kid, son of a Canadian soccer legend, who has accepted a call from the USA, to play in their friendly against South Africa next week.

I won’t lie, my reaction was a hearty “ah, shit”. And, understandably, the announcement has prompted plenty of consternation (not to mention ad hominem attacks) from Canada’s most ardent supporters.

This may not be the end for Teal Bunbury and Canada, though. In fact, oddly enough, it may just be the beginning. Continue reading

The Canadian Soccer Mustache Contest

Posted in Canada, Vancouver Whitecaps with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 11, 2010 by Jamie

In honour of Movember, we at Some Canadian Guys are pleased to announce the Canadian Soccer Mustache Contest. Below you’ll find a selection of the very finest facial hair in Canadian soccer history (well, the finest facial hair that can be found in the player photos on the CSA’s website, at least), and a chance to choose your favourite. Continue reading

The Curious Case of Andy Najar

Posted in CONCACAF with tags , , on November 11, 2010 by Grant

No. Sadly this post is not a sensational exposé about how MLS rookie of the year Andy Najar was in fact born with the physical appearance of a 70-year-old man and subsequently began to age backward. But it might serve as future reference material for migrant footballers around the globe wishing to dodge the awkward question of which country they’ll represent internationally.

We’ve written about Najar previously. And as his stock continues to rise, so does the ambiguity of his statements about whether he will eventually don a Honduran or an American shirt for international play.

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Long balls: Canadians abroad (November 7)

Posted in Canada, International with tags on November 10, 2010 by Grant

Welcome to another edition of Long Balls: Canadians Abroad. It’s a service for those without time to wade through multi-page forum threads to keep tabs on Canadian footballers. We won’t list all of the Canadians abroad, just the weekly performances we feel are most relevant to our readers. Or in the case of Isidro Sanchez, relevant to no one.

So let’s see… American politics mired in deadlock, China conducting a census and Tomasz Radzinski slamming in goal after goal in Belgium. Is this November 2000 or November 2010?

(Yep, there’s a reason this site is free.)

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Canada’s women: Winning one for all of us

Posted in Canada, World Cup with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2010 by squizz

There have only been two instances in which I’ve been able to see Jack Warner‘s face without feeling the bile rising up in the back of my throat. On both occasions, he’s handing a Gold Cup trophy to the captain of a Canadian national team.

Ten years ago, it was Jason de Vos. And last night, it was Christine Sinclair.

Ten years ago, it was a fortuitous coin flip that allowed the men to progress into the knockout stages of the tournament. Last week, the biggest upset in women’s soccer history (the Mexicans’ semi-final defeat of the #1-ranked USA) gave Big Red an easier path to the trophy than they were anticipating.

Ten years ago, the men’s national team had high expectations after the recent appointment of a well-regarded international manager (Holger Osieck). Today, the women have Carolina Morace.

But that’s where the similarities end. Whereas the men’s Gold Cup success never translated over into World Cup qualifying, and dissension within the dressing room helped contribute to Osieck’s departure, I can’t help but think that this women’s side may be at the precipice of a defining moment in Canadian soccer. Continue reading